Looking for wifi router below 100€ to put behind shitty ISP modem

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Comments

  • @bikegremlin said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @bikegremlin said:
    Just checked - my current low-end ISP provided me with TP-Link Archer C6 AC1200:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v4/

    The older model (V2) comes with a Qualcomm chip and that would be my first pick:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v2/

    Sells for about 50 euros locally.
    TP-Link in generall has served me so well on a budget that I find it hard to justify paying more.

    Yeah, was also considering the C6 because..why not? It has multiple gbit ports, dualband wifi , good reviews and is affordable. Currently at 36,99€ on Amazon.

    I would still advise to go for a WiFi 6 model. May seem overkill now, but in 2 years most devices will make use of it. Less congestion and better coverage. It works great for me. And that AX10 is just 20 EUR more expensive.

    In all fairness, that C6 (and direct predecessor C5) has been on the market for almost 10 years now.

    What is the exact advantage of Wifi 6 now? Asus website has an animation where Wifi 5 sends a packet to one enduser-device after another, while Wifi 6 sends multiple packages to various different devices simultaneously. But yeah, the AX10 also looks good.

    Practically wifi 6 is more efficient. It uses OFDMA multiplexing. This makes for a wifi connection that's more stable and speeds that are more evenly divided over devices. Thankt to OFDMA and BSS Coloring the coverage is also better. Especially important in an apartment (less noise from your neighbours).

    Most devices support BSS Coloring, for OFDMA you need wifi 6 capable devices. Most mid-range and high-end smartphones already support this, as do most newly sold laptops. So if you don't have any capable devices now, chances are you will have these in the next years.

    I see it more as buying a future proof router now.

    Future proof hardly ever makes sense. Just burning money. Unfortunately.

    I get the idea, but when you sum up all the pros and cons, I think it's better to buy cheaper, then get a new one in 3-5 years, once most of your equipment supports the new protocol.

    Of course, if the price difference is symbolic and/or the newer model has other options you fancy (aside from future-proofing), then it makes more sense.

    Yes and no. If I buy new equipment I usually do so for at least 5 years. So future proofing is definitely no waste of money here.

    Furthermore, with routers, a newer model usually means a faster SoC, sometimes more memory so performance is usually better.

    But I have to admit that I don’t have a low end lifestyle. I usually like to pay a bit more, but I have the funds to back it up. Just don’t ask what my network setup at home cost me.

    Thanked by (2)Ympker bikegremlin
  • YmpkerYmpker OGContent Writer
    edited August 3

    Future proof hardly ever makes sense. Just burning money. Unfortunately.

    I get the idea, but when you sum up all the pros and cons, I think it's better to buy cheaper, then get a new one in 3-5 years, once most of your equipment supports the new protocol.

    Of course, if the price difference is symbolic and/or the newer model has other options you fancy (aside from future-proofing), then it makes more sense.

    Yes and no. If I buy new equipment I usually do so for at least 5 years. So future proofing is definitely no waste of money here.

    Furthermore, with routers, a newer model usually means a faster SoC, sometimes more memory so performance is usually better.

    But I have to admit that I don’t have a low end lifestyle. I usually like to pay a bit more, but I have the funds to back it up. Just don’t ask what my network setup at home cost me.

    I definitely see the point, buying something that will be considered a good standard for years to come.
    Normally, I would also agree to go for something that is a tad more expensive than going cheap. Us being two students, hoewever, the costs of moving kinda add up (washing machine, fridge, shelves, sofa, desk, bed...), so it's currently not within our budget. Likely to upgrade later, even if that means we now have to rent the modem for the next 24 months. Some of the suggested wifi routers seem like they will still do their job just fine :)

  • bikegremlinbikegremlin ModeratorOG

    @debaser said:

    @bikegremlin said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @bikegremlin said:
    Just checked - my current low-end ISP provided me with TP-Link Archer C6 AC1200:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v4/

    The older model (V2) comes with a Qualcomm chip and that would be my first pick:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v2/

    Sells for about 50 euros locally.
    TP-Link in generall has served me so well on a budget that I find it hard to justify paying more.

    Yeah, was also considering the C6 because..why not? It has multiple gbit ports, dualband wifi , good reviews and is affordable. Currently at 36,99€ on Amazon.

    I would still advise to go for a WiFi 6 model. May seem overkill now, but in 2 years most devices will make use of it. Less congestion and better coverage. It works great for me. And that AX10 is just 20 EUR more expensive.

    In all fairness, that C6 (and direct predecessor C5) has been on the market for almost 10 years now.

    What is the exact advantage of Wifi 6 now? Asus website has an animation where Wifi 5 sends a packet to one enduser-device after another, while Wifi 6 sends multiple packages to various different devices simultaneously. But yeah, the AX10 also looks good.

    Practically wifi 6 is more efficient. It uses OFDMA multiplexing. This makes for a wifi connection that's more stable and speeds that are more evenly divided over devices. Thankt to OFDMA and BSS Coloring the coverage is also better. Especially important in an apartment (less noise from your neighbours).

    Most devices support BSS Coloring, for OFDMA you need wifi 6 capable devices. Most mid-range and high-end smartphones already support this, as do most newly sold laptops. So if you don't have any capable devices now, chances are you will have these in the next years.

    I see it more as buying a future proof router now.

    Future proof hardly ever makes sense. Just burning money. Unfortunately.

    I get the idea, but when you sum up all the pros and cons, I think it's better to buy cheaper, then get a new one in 3-5 years, once most of your equipment supports the new protocol.

    Of course, if the price difference is symbolic and/or the newer model has other options you fancy (aside from future-proofing), then it makes more sense.

    Yes and no. If I buy new equipment I usually do so for at least 5 years. So future proofing is definitely no waste of money here.

    Furthermore, with routers, a newer model usually means a faster SoC, sometimes more memory so performance is usually better.

    But I have to admit that I don’t have a low end lifestyle. I usually like to pay a bit more, but I have the funds to back it up. Just don’t ask what my network setup at home cost me.

    If you live in a "1st world" country - just multiply every price by 5 and see if you would still consider it worth paying.

    If not, then my hat off to you sir. I try to go for higher quality, but the budget is often quite limited.
    So I usually try to get the "best bang for the buck." Not always, but most often.

    I can't tell you which hosting to buy, but I've written in great detail about the providers I've used so far:
    BikeGremlin web-hosting reviews

  • debaserdebaser OG
    edited August 3

    @bikegremlin said:

    @debaser said:

    @bikegremlin said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @bikegremlin said:
    Just checked - my current low-end ISP provided me with TP-Link Archer C6 AC1200:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v4/

    The older model (V2) comes with a Qualcomm chip and that would be my first pick:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v2/

    Sells for about 50 euros locally.
    TP-Link in generall has served me so well on a budget that I find it hard to justify paying more.

    Yeah, was also considering the C6 because..why not? It has multiple gbit ports, dualband wifi , good reviews and is affordable. Currently at 36,99€ on Amazon.

    I would still advise to go for a WiFi 6 model. May seem overkill now, but in 2 years most devices will make use of it. Less congestion and better coverage. It works great for me. And that AX10 is just 20 EUR more expensive.

    In all fairness, that C6 (and direct predecessor C5) has been on the market for almost 10 years now.

    What is the exact advantage of Wifi 6 now? Asus website has an animation where Wifi 5 sends a packet to one enduser-device after another, while Wifi 6 sends multiple packages to various different devices simultaneously. But yeah, the AX10 also looks good.

    Practically wifi 6 is more efficient. It uses OFDMA multiplexing. This makes for a wifi connection that's more stable and speeds that are more evenly divided over devices. Thankt to OFDMA and BSS Coloring the coverage is also better. Especially important in an apartment (less noise from your neighbours).

    Most devices support BSS Coloring, for OFDMA you need wifi 6 capable devices. Most mid-range and high-end smartphones already support this, as do most newly sold laptops. So if you don't have any capable devices now, chances are you will have these in the next years.

    I see it more as buying a future proof router now.

    Future proof hardly ever makes sense. Just burning money. Unfortunately.

    I get the idea, but when you sum up all the pros and cons, I think it's better to buy cheaper, then get a new one in 3-5 years, once most of your equipment supports the new protocol.

    Of course, if the price difference is symbolic and/or the newer model has other options you fancy (aside from future-proofing), then it makes more sense.

    Yes and no. If I buy new equipment I usually do so for at least 5 years. So future proofing is definitely no waste of money here.

    Furthermore, with routers, a newer model usually means a faster SoC, sometimes more memory so performance is usually better.

    But I have to admit that I don’t have a low end lifestyle. I usually like to pay a bit more, but I have the funds to back it up. Just don’t ask what my network setup at home cost me.

    If you live in a "1st world" country - just multiply every price by 5 and see if you would still consider it worth paying.

    In case of that router, well: yes. Really doesn’t come close to what my home network has cost me. Good to note that it’s also kind of a hobby,

    If not, then my hat off to you sir. I try to go for higher quality, but the budget is often quite limited.
    So I usually try to get the "best bang for the buck." Not always, but most often.

    What strikes me is that new electronics are equally expensive or even more expensive in Eastern Europe for instance. But that’s a very different discussion.

    Best bang for buck is never wrong. But I also calculate short term and long term expenses. Buying a cheaper new device every two years might be more expensive than buying one that’s going to cost me more now, but will last longer. Of course I know that’s a privilege not everyone has.

    Thanked by (1)bikegremlin
  • bikegremlinbikegremlin ModeratorOG
    edited August 4

    @debaser said:

    @bikegremlin said:

    @debaser said:

    @bikegremlin said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @debaser said:

    @Ympker said:

    @bikegremlin said:
    Just checked - my current low-end ISP provided me with TP-Link Archer C6 AC1200:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v4/

    The older model (V2) comes with a Qualcomm chip and that would be my first pick:
    https://www.tp-link.com/in/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c6/v2/

    Sells for about 50 euros locally.
    TP-Link in generall has served me so well on a budget that I find it hard to justify paying more.

    Yeah, was also considering the C6 because..why not? It has multiple gbit ports, dualband wifi , good reviews and is affordable. Currently at 36,99€ on Amazon.

    I would still advise to go for a WiFi 6 model. May seem overkill now, but in 2 years most devices will make use of it. Less congestion and better coverage. It works great for me. And that AX10 is just 20 EUR more expensive.

    In all fairness, that C6 (and direct predecessor C5) has been on the market for almost 10 years now.

    What is the exact advantage of Wifi 6 now? Asus website has an animation where Wifi 5 sends a packet to one enduser-device after another, while Wifi 6 sends multiple packages to various different devices simultaneously. But yeah, the AX10 also looks good.

    Practically wifi 6 is more efficient. It uses OFDMA multiplexing. This makes for a wifi connection that's more stable and speeds that are more evenly divided over devices. Thankt to OFDMA and BSS Coloring the coverage is also better. Especially important in an apartment (less noise from your neighbours).

    Most devices support BSS Coloring, for OFDMA you need wifi 6 capable devices. Most mid-range and high-end smartphones already support this, as do most newly sold laptops. So if you don't have any capable devices now, chances are you will have these in the next years.

    I see it more as buying a future proof router now.

    Future proof hardly ever makes sense. Just burning money. Unfortunately.

    I get the idea, but when you sum up all the pros and cons, I think it's better to buy cheaper, then get a new one in 3-5 years, once most of your equipment supports the new protocol.

    Of course, if the price difference is symbolic and/or the newer model has other options you fancy (aside from future-proofing), then it makes more sense.

    Yes and no. If I buy new equipment I usually do so for at least 5 years. So future proofing is definitely no waste of money here.

    Furthermore, with routers, a newer model usually means a faster SoC, sometimes more memory so performance is usually better.

    But I have to admit that I don’t have a low end lifestyle. I usually like to pay a bit more, but I have the funds to back it up. Just don’t ask what my network setup at home cost me.

    If you live in a "1st world" country - just multiply every price by 5 and see if you would still consider it worth paying.

    In case of that router, well: yes. Really doesn’t come close to what my home network has cost me. Good to note that it’s also kind of a hobby,

    If not, then my hat off to you sir. I try to go for higher quality, but the budget is often quite limited.
    So I usually try to get the "best bang for the buck." Not always, but most often.

    What strikes me is that new electronics are equally expensive or even more expensive in Eastern Europe for instance. But that’s a very different discussion.

    Best bang for buck is never wrong. But I also calculate short term and long term expenses. Buying a cheaper new device every two years might be more expensive than buying one that’s going to cost me more now, but will last longer. Of course I know that’s a privilege not everyone has.

    I'm not talking about electronics prices.
    I'm talking about price-to-pay ratio.
    I.e. a high-quality router taking a full monthly pay VS one week's pay VS 4 hours of work etc.

    In other words: different perspective based on incomes and budgets (as seems to be the case with Ympker now, in his current situation).

    Thanked by (1)Ympker

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    BikeGremlin web-hosting reviews

  • @bikegremlin said:
    I'm not talking about electronics prices.
    I'm talking about price-to-pay ratio.
    I.e. a high-quality router taking a full monthly pay VS one week's pay VS 4 hours of work etc.

    An effect that is amplified because (at least within Europe) electronics are priced equally in high income countries as they are in lower income countries. Which is what I meant.

    In other words: different perspective based on incomes and budgets (as seems to be the case with Ympker now, in his current situation).

    Which I totally understand.

    But the title of this thread still says "below € 100" and the routers I recommend are both very much below that price point. If the title said "below € 50" or "as cheap as possible" I wouldn't have made these recommendations.

    I don't feel like dragging this one, but there seems to be at least some kind of misunderstanding here and I certainly don't care to be lectured about financial differences. Because I know that very well, growing up in a relatively poor family. But € 100 is still € 100.

    Thanked by (2)Ympker bikegremlin
  • YmpkerYmpker OGContent Writer

    @debaser said:

    @bikegremlin said:
    I'm not talking about electronics prices.
    I'm talking about price-to-pay ratio.
    I.e. a high-quality router taking a full monthly pay VS one week's pay VS 4 hours of work etc.

    An effect that is amplified because (at least within Europe) electronics are priced equally in high income countries as they are in lower income countries. Which is what I meant.

    In other words: different perspective based on incomes and budgets (as seems to be the case with Ympker now, in his current situation).

    Which I totally understand.

    But the title of this thread still says "below € 100" and the routers I recommend are both very much below that price point. If the title said "below € 50" or "as cheap as possible" I wouldn't have made these recommendations.

    I don't feel like dragging this one, but there seems to be at least some kind of misunderstanding here and I certainly don't care to be lectured about financial differences. Because I know that very well, growing up in a relatively poor family. But € 100 is still € 100.

    Don't want to cause any turmoil here. Both of you are correct. Like @debaser said, the budget specified is below 100€ so any suggestions up to that price are totally fine and welcome. The idea from @bikegremlin to not spend more than is really needed regarding the moving situation and costs adding up isn't bad either. That is to say, while cost shouldn't be the deciding factor as long as it stays below 100€, it isn't wrong to save money if a economically more affordable device will also do a good job.

    Love all of your comments and help, so no need to argue <3

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  • @Ympker said:
    Don't want to cause any turmoil here.

    And neither do I. But being accused of being insensitive of peoples budget usually gives me a very nasty itch. Because while I do have more than enough money now, it didn't always used to be that way.

    Might have overreacted, but the message is clear. Of course, @Ympker, I should've understood your position a bit better. This context was a bit lost on me.

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  • bikegremlinbikegremlin ModeratorOG
    edited August 4

    @debaser said:

    @bikegremlin said:
    I'm not talking about electronics prices.
    I'm talking about price-to-pay ratio.
    I.e. a high-quality router taking a full monthly pay VS one week's pay VS 4 hours of work etc.

    I don't feel like dragging this one, but there seems to be at least some kind of misunderstanding here and I certainly don't care to be lectured about financial differences. Because I know that very well, growing up in a relatively poor family. But € 100 is still € 100.

    It's written communication in a foreign language.
    I'm not arguing. Nor accusing - as you noted in another reply.

    Your input is good - I was just offering a different perspective.
    I.e. it wasn't intended as an insult or an accusation.

    Edit:
    For what it's worht, the perspective change is what I'm guilty of.
    I would have recommended a more expensive option if the current budget situation wasn't so explicitly and repeatedly stressed by Ympker.

    Thanked by (1)debaser

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  • rootroot OG
    edited August 4

    4 days ago I got the following router, for just 1€. I wrote OpenWRT on it, and it's ready as backup. This is low-end.

    Thanked by (2)Ympker hostdare
  • OPNSense or pfsense on a cheap corporate SFF desktop like OptiPlex 3020, Lenovo m73, etc.? (Those are super old 4th-gen chips; newer is fine, too.) Add a I340-T2 or I350-T2 PCIe NIC. Separate AP.

  • I've personally had good luck with ASUS RT-AX92U....but outside of specified budget. :(

    @BlaZe said:
    Using TP-Link Archer C60 v2.0 for a year.

    There are always around 20ish devices connected to the router (my desktop - wired, rest are wireless like cameras, mobiles, printer, etc.) and the router stays ON 24x7

    Stable AF!

    Noooo. That's a 100mbps eth device...while OP has 250mbps internet.

    (.C60 is a good choice for openwrt though in niche cases where the 100mbps isn't an issue.)

  • MikroTik hAP ac3, not sure exact prices, but should be close to €100 ...
    With RouterOS 7 it should have Wifi6, WireGuard etc.
    https://mikrotik.com/product/hap_ac3

  • BlaZeBlaZe Hosting ProviderOG

    @havoc said:
    I've personally had good luck with ASUS RT-AX92U....but outside of specified budget. :(

    @BlaZe said:
    Using TP-Link Archer C60 v2.0 for a year.

    There are always around 20ish devices connected to the router (my desktop - wired, rest are wireless like cameras, mobiles, printer, etc.) and the router stays ON 24x7

    Stable AF!

    Noooo. That's a 100mbps eth device...while OP has 250mbps internet.

    (.C60 is a good choice for openwrt though in niche cases where the 100mbps isn't an issue.)

    I think it's 300Mbps. Gotta check it out though lol. Haven't bothered even looking at the router since its installation a year back.

    Fuck my memory! ngl I'm getting old.

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  • YmpkerYmpker OGContent Writer
    edited August 7

    Moving at the end of August where I will then decide on a router (and easily return it within 14-30 days if not to satisfaction). Thanks for all the suggestions so far! :)

  • If you're as stingy as I am and can live with a really stupid AP - grab one of those AC 4x4 APs at your local o2 store.
    https://www.o2online.de/e-shop/o2-homebox-satellite-repeater-details

    Working fine in AP mode. 3€.

  • YmpkerYmpker OGContent Writer
    edited August 7

    @benz said:
    If you're as stingy as I am and can live with a really stupid AP - grab one of those AC 4x4 APs at your local o2 store.
    https://www.o2online.de/e-shop/o2-homebox-satellite-repeater-details

    Working fine in AP mode. 3€.

    Lol, didn't know that one. I think that won't do since I would also need some gigabit LAN ports, so a Router is preferred, but looks nice.

    I also still have a TP Link RE650 AP/Repeater (which is fairly powerful) lying around. Could also consider using a Gigabit switch to get the additional Gigabit LAN ports and use the RE650 for Wifi without any additional router. Hmm, may give this a try, too. Thanks for the idea!

    So that would be:
    ISP modem --> gigabit port to gigabit switch with 5 Gigabit LAN ports. Use RE650 as a WiFi repeater/AP for strong wifi.

  • @BlaZe said: I think it's 300Mbps.

    You're confusing wifi speed and eth ports. It's quite common for routers to have far higher radio throughput than the cable part can handle. Since internet comes in over the cable the lower of the two matters

    1 × 10/100Mbps WAN Port

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  • edited August 7

    Mikrotik is a good tweakable (proprietary linux) router, but their wifi is shit out of the box.
    Ubiquiti is a proprietary crap router, but their Unifi wifi APs are good.
    You'll have to give more and combine.
    Or you'll have to use Mikrotik and know how to tune the wifi for max performance or max range (still won't beat Unifi), your choice.

    Or get something like Huawei AX3, cheap (not cheapest) WiFi6 device, next, next finish setup, not tweakable, lots of CPU and fast wifi/cable speed, low strenght wifi signal, but still fast speeds. Plus it contacts friends from China.

    Thanked by (1)Ympker

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  • xiaomi ax6s / ax3200 then flash firmware using openwrt

    good enough for me

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  • cybertechcybertech OGBenchmark King

    ordered an ax55 in the name of Wifi6 🫢

    Thanked by (1)Ympker

    I bench YABS 24/7/365 unless it's a leap year.

  • YmpkerYmpker OGContent Writer

    @cybertech said:
    ordered an ax55 in the name of Wifi6 🫢

    Glad, this thread got others to buy stuff, too haha :D Have fun, mate!

    Thanked by (1)cybertech
  • cybertechcybertech OGBenchmark King

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    I bench YABS 24/7/365 unless it's a leap year.

  • YmpkerYmpker OGContent Writer
    edited September 2

    Due to budgeting reasons and lots of accumulating investments for the flat, I gave my old Asus RT-AC58U a try and what can I say? Bought it in 2019 and it maxes out the 250/40 Mbits line flawlessly, given that on LAN directly at the modem I get 210 Mbits.

    This is Wifi:

    So everything's working great :)

    Thanked by (1)cybertech
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