ChatGPT responses: Merging different wordpress sites

vyasvyas OGContent Writer
edited February 19 in WordPress

**Note: This is a LONG post. **

This morning, I was checking out some new prompts for ChatGPT, I thought of asking some Wp related queries, and asked questions for the following theme:

Merging different wordpress sites- Multisite, or merge with URL forward?

For brevity, I have collapsed the answers, and you will have to click on each response individually. This conversation (with inputs from WP users /tinkerers/ experts on LES) could become a handy resource for the community. Or so is the thought.

Questions for LES community:
a. Have you tried to maintain separate domains for blog and main site (or say, portfolio site and main site) ? What method(s) and CMS have you used?
Note: Atlesat one CMS shold be WordPress - to keep the topic in context.
b. Have you tried WordPress multisite? Was it a subfolder or subdomain? What pros and cons do you see for either?
c. Have you merged different domains and brought content under a single roof? Do you see any pros or cons to this approach?


First Prompt
Q. I have two websites, both use wordpress. One is the main site with the domain mysite.in. The second site is a blog, on a subdomain blog.mysite.in. I need to merge the two sites. What are my options to merge the blog with the main site? What will be impact on the URLs?

The response from ChatGPT was: (click details to read)

Response to first prompt

There are several options to merge the blog with the main site, depending on how you want the merged site to be organized and how you want to handle the existing URLs.

Option 1: Use WordPress Multisite
WordPress Multisite is a feature that allows you to run multiple WordPress sites from a single installation. With Multisite, you can create a network of sites that share the same WordPress core files, but have separate databases and content. In your case, you could use Multisite to merge the blog into the main site and have them both share the same domain (mysite.in). The impact on URLs will depend on how you set up your Multisite installation. You could keep the existing URLs for the main site and blog, or you could choose to restructure the URLs to reflect the new merged site.

Option 2: Merge the blog into the main site manually
If you prefer not to use Multisite, you could merge the blog into the main site manually. This would involve exporting the content from the blog and importing it into the main site. You would also need to copy over any customizations you have made to the blog's theme or plugins. The impact on URLs will depend on how you handle the existing URLs. You could keep the blog's URLs and set up redirects from the old blog URLs to the new URLs on the main site, or you could change the blog's URLs to match the main site's URLs.
**
Option 3: Use a third-party plugin or service**
There are several third-party plugins and services available that can help you merge WordPress sites. These typically involve exporting content from the blog and importing it into the main site, along with any necessary customizations. The impact on URLs will depend on the specific plugin or service you use and how you configure it.


vyas comment: Last paragraph, though it may sound like a disclaimer, was quite important - though it is stating the obvious.

Regardless of which option you choose, it's important to create backups of both sites before attempting to merge them, in case anything goes wrong during the process.


Second Prompt

Q. From the above options, if I want to choose the first option- Using WordPress multisite, what are the steps to follow?

Response to Second prompt
Here are the high-level steps to follow if you want to use WordPress Multisite to merge your blog into your main site:

Back up both sites: Before you begin the merging process, make sure to back up both your main site and your blog. This will allow you to restore your sites to their previous states if something goes wrong during the merge.

Set up WordPress Multisite: If you haven't already, you'll need to set up WordPress Multisite on your main site. You can find instructions on how to do this in the WordPress Codex.

Create a new site: Once you've set up Multisite, you'll need to create a new site for your blog. To do this, log in to your main site's dashboard, go to the "My Sites" menu, and click "Network Admin" -> "Sites" -> "Add New". Fill in the required information, including the site name and URL. The URL should be set to "blog.mysite.in" to match your existing blog's URL.

Install necessary plugins and themes: Install any necessary plugins and themes on the new site to match those on your existing blog.

Export content from the blog: In your blog's dashboard, go to "Tools" -> "Export" and select "All content" to export all of your blog's content. Save the resulting XML file to your computer.

Import content into the new site: In your new site's dashboard, go to "Tools" -> "Import" -> "WordPress" and upload the XML file you exported from your blog. Make sure to check the box to import media attachments.

Set up redirects: If you want to keep the same URLs for your blog posts, you'll need to set up redirects from the old URLs to the new URLs on your main site. You can use a plugin like Redirection to set up these redirects.

Test and refine: Once you've completed the merge, test your new site thoroughly to make sure everything is working as expected. You may need to refine your site's settings, plugins, and themes to get everything working smoothly.

It's important to note that merging sites can be a complex process, so you may want to consult with a WordPress developer or experienced user if you're not familiar with the process. Additionally, be sure to have a solid backup plan in place before you begin, as the merging process can be risky and may result in data loss if something goes wrong.

Third Prompt

Q. Is the above option equivalent to creating a wordpress multisite with a subdomain option?

Response to third prompt
Yes, creating a WordPress Multisite with a subdomain option is essentially the same as creating a separate site for your blog within your existing Multisite network. In the case of a subdomain Multisite setup, you would create a new site with the subdomain "blog.mysite.in" and install WordPress and any necessary plugins and themes there. You would then export the content from your existing blog and import it into the new site.

Once you've completed the import process, you would then need to configure the site settings, including the site's permalink structure, to ensure that your URLs match the structure of your existing site. You would also need to set up any necessary redirects to ensure that traffic to your old blog URLs is redirected to the new URLs on your main site.

In general, a subdomain Multisite setup is a good option if you want to keep your blog content separate from your main site content, but still have it accessible from the same domain. It can also be a good way to manage multiple sites from a single WordPress installation, and can make it easier to share resources like themes and plugins across your sites.


Fourth Prompt

Q. In the above example of moving my blog to wordpress multisite, will I have to change the DNS entries with my domain registrar?

Response to fourth prompt
It depends on how your DNS entries are currently configured.

If your current blog is hosted on a separate server or hosting account than your main site, and you're moving it to a new site within your existing WordPress Multisite network, then you likely won't need to make any changes to your DNS entries.

However, if your blog is currently hosted on a subdomain (e.g. blog.mysite.in) and you want to move it to a new site within your Multisite network, you may need to update your DNS entries to point the blog subdomain to your main site's server. This will ensure that visitors can still access your blog content at the same subdomain (blog.mysite.in) after the move.

In general, it's a good idea to check with your domain registrar or hosting provider to confirm what DNS changes may be necessary before you begin the move process. They should be able to provide guidance on any necessary changes, and can help ensure that your site remains accessible to visitors throughout the process.

Fifth Prompt

Q. I use cloudflare currently with two sets of DNS entries, one for blog.mydomain.in, other for mydomain.in. This is, because both sites are hosted on different servers which have different ip addresses. Once I opt for wordpress multisite, will my cloudflare entries change?

Response to fifth prompt
If you opt to use WordPress Multisite to merge your blog into your main site, your Cloudflare DNS entries may need to be updated to reflect the new site structure. Specifically, you will need to update your DNS entries for the blog subdomain (blog.mydomain.in) to point to the same server as your main site.

To do this, you can update the DNS record for your blog subdomain in your Cloudflare dashboard to point to the IP address of your main site's server. This will ensure that visitors can still access your blog content after the merge.

It's important to note that Cloudflare may take some time to propagate these changes across its network, so there may be a brief period during which your blog is unavailable after the merge. However, this downtime should be minimal if your DNS changes are made correctly and efficiently.

In general, it's a good idea to check with your hosting provider and/or Cloudflare support to ensure that your DNS changes are made correctly and that your site remains accessible to visitors throughout the process.


Sixth Prompt

Q. From the three options of merging my blog, let us say I want to opt for option 2: Merge the blog into the main site manually. What will be the steps I will need to follow?

Response to sixth prompt
Merging your blog into your main site manually can be a bit more complex than using WordPress Multisite, but it can be a good option if you want more control over the process. Here are the general steps you will need to follow:

Back up your existing blog: Before you begin the merge process, it's important to back up all of your blog content, including posts, pages, comments, media files, and any customizations you've made to your blog's theme or plugins. You can use a plugin like UpdraftPlus or BackupBuddy to create a full backup of your site.

Install WordPress on your main site: If your main site doesn't already use WordPress, you'll need to install it first. You can do this manually by downloading the WordPress software from WordPress.org and uploading it to your main site's hosting account, or you can use a one-click installer provided by your hosting provider.

Export your blog content: In your existing blog's WordPress dashboard, navigate to Tools > Export. Select "All content" and click the "Download Export File" button to save an XML file containing all of your blog content to your computer.
**
Import your blog content**: In your main site's WordPress dashboard, navigate to Tools > Import. Choose the "WordPress" option and install the WordPress importer plugin if necessary. Upload the XML file you exported in step 3 and follow the prompts to import your blog content into your main site.

Configure your main site: Once your blog content has been imported, you will need to configure your main site's settings to reflect your new site structure. This may include updating your site's permalink structure to match your blog's URLs, setting up any necessary redirects, and configuring your site's theme and plugins to display your blog content as desired.

Test and troubleshoot: Once you've completed the merge process, it's important to thoroughly test your main site to ensure that all of your blog content is displaying correctly and that there are no broken links or other issues. You may also need to troubleshoot any issues that arise, such as formatting or display issues with your imported content.

Overall, merging your blog into your main site manually can be a time-consuming process, but it can give you more control over the end result. If you're not comfortable with the technical aspects of the merge process, you may want to consider working with a WordPress developer or other professional to help guide you through the process.


Seventh Prompt

Q.From a seo and site maintenance perspective: Which option is preferred? Having a blog as a subdomain, or merge the blog into the main site?

Response to seventh prompt
From a SEO and site maintenance perspective, merging your blog into your main site is generally preferred over having a separate blog subdomain. Here are a few reasons why:

Improved SEO: When you merge your blog into your main site, you consolidate all of your content into a single domain, which can help to improve your site's overall search engine rankings. This is because search engines tend to prioritize domains with high-quality, authoritative content, and having all of your content on a single domain can help to establish your site as an authority in your niche.
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Easier site maintenance**: Maintaining a single site is generally easier than maintaining multiple sites or subdomains. When your blog is integrated into your main site, you can manage all of your content from a single WordPress dashboard, which can simplify your workflow and make it easier to keep your site up-to-date.

Better user experience: Having a single, unified site can provide a better user experience for your visitors, as they can easily navigate between your main site and your blog without having to switch domains or subdomains. This can help to keep visitors engaged with your site and encourage them to explore more of your content.

That being said, there are some cases where having a separate blog subdomain may be preferable. For example, if your blog covers a completely different topic or audience than your main site, it may make sense to keep them separate. However, in most cases, merging your blog into your main site is the better option for SEO and site maintenance purposes.

Eighth Prompt

Q.My main site mydomain.in is on WordPress. However, I want to use a different content management system for my blog, which is on a subdomain. I want to host both mydomain.in and blog.mydomain.in on the same server. What should my setup look like?

Response to eighth prompt
If you want to use a different content management system for your blog, you can still host both your main site and your blog on the same server. Here's what your setup could look like:

Choose your content management system: First, you'll need to choose a content management system (CMS) for your blog. Some popular options include Ghost, Drupal, and Joomla. Be sure to choose a CMS that can be installed on your server and that is compatible with your hosting environment.

Install your CMS: Once you've chosen your CMS, you'll need to install it on your server. This process will vary depending on the CMS you choose, but most will require you to create a database and user account, upload the CMS files to your server, and run an installation script.

Configure your blog subdomain: Next, you'll need to configure your blog subdomain to point to your CMS installation. This will involve creating a new subdomain in your domain registrar or hosting control panel and pointing it to the directory where you installed your CMS.

Configure your server: Depending on your server setup, you may need to configure your server to handle requests for your blog subdomain separately from your main site. This may involve configuring virtual hosts in your web server or setting up a reverse proxy to redirect requests to your CMS.

Link your main site and your blog: Finally, you'll need to create links between your main site and your blog to make it easy for users to navigate between the two. This could involve adding a menu item to your main site's navigation menu that links to your blog, or adding a widget or link in your blog's sidebar that links back to your main site.

Overall, hosting both your main site and your blog on the same server with different content management systems can be a bit more complex than hosting them both on the same CMS, but it can give you more flexibility and control over your site. Be sure to follow best practices for server security and regularly update your CMS and server software to ensure your site stays secure and up-to-date.


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Comments

  • a. Have you tried to maintain separate domains for blog and main site (or say, portfolio site and main site) ? What method(s) and CMS have you used?
    Note: Atlesat one CMS shold be WordPress - to keep the topic in context.

    Used to maintain wordpress, but for now i just change to static page generator like Hugo / Jekyll, or just outright using html5 template for something more simple (html5up has a lot of neat template)

    b. Have you tried WordPress multisite? Was it a subfolder or subdomain? What pros and cons do you see for either?

    both multisite and subfolder. I prefer using multi subdomain IF the site really need different set of plugins so i can just whitelist one of them on modsec for troubleshooting / permanent whitelist in case modsec said "wait you can't do that! that's illegal from this rule number .etc.etc" but i fully understand it is intent.

    c. Have you merged different domains and brought content under a single roof? Do you see any pros or cons to this approach?

    i have, but really limited to Posts section, so it's just as easy as export-import an xml file. then replace some image url afterward

    Thanked by (1)vyas

    Fuck this 24/7 internet spew of trivia and celebrity bullshit.

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