How can I start selling VPS?

What's the most cost-effective way to begin selling or reselling VPS? What tools are required, and how does the entire process work?

Success is not just a destination; it's a journey of growth, learning, and resilience. 🚀🌱

Tagged:

Comments

  • The best thing is not to start doing it.
    It's a very saturated market. If you don't know what added value you're going to bring. Then you're likely to go bankrupt within 2 years.

    It's tough, but that's what I think.

  • edited February 7

    @remy said: The best thing is not to start doing it.

    It's not about bankruptcy, nor it is about making money from it at this moment. I want to learn about it first before diving in.

    Success is not just a destination; it's a journey of growth, learning, and resilience. 🚀🌱

  • vishvish OG
    edited February 7

    @Rambo said:
    What's the most cost-effective way to begin selling or reselling VPS? What tools are required, and how does the entire process work?

    1. Pick a Niche
      The first step in starting a successful VPS reseller hosting business starts with planning. Decide on a target market and let that guide your decision making. This could be clients from a particular location or industry, for example.

    2. Set Your Standards
      Now that you have an idea of what your potential clients’ needs are, you can begin looking at plans. Rule out the ones that do not meet your basic requirements. Potential factors that you may want to take into consideration include:

    ● Location. Having VPS servers in specific locations leads to a faster hosting experience. Look for hosting companies that have data centers in your desired location.

    ● Operating Systems. In order to deploy your VPS reseller servers, you need to decide on an operating system to use. Leading hosting companies like ColonCrossing are able to deploy your servers with almost any operating system. Operating systems that you should look into are CentOS, Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora. Whatever you decide on, you should make sure that your hosting company supports it/them.

    ● Security. If a hosting company is not emphasizing security in their offering, it is probably best to avoid them. Security is of the utmost importance, and should be included in your package at no cost. 3. Pick Your Plan

    Now that you have ruled out the plans that don’t meet your basic needs and those of your potential customers, it is time to start narrowing your choices down. You should aim to get the best value from your account, competitive companies should offer:

    ● 100% Uptime.

    ● Reliable Backups. Your data should never be at risk, ColonCrossing offers snapshot and backup facilities for your VPS.

    ● Speed. ColonCrossing is up to 16x faster with RAID10 SSD storage, directly attached to the node.

    ● Security. As previously stated, security is a must for web hosting. Our servers have free, enterprise-grade DDoS protection at no cost.

    ● Flexibility. You shouldn’t be stuck paying for resources that you don’t use.

    ● Fast deployment. Utilise our OS templates or use a custom ISO and have your server online in seconds.

    ● Powerful Performance. VPS servers offer powerful performance that is backed by Intel Xeon Processors. No task is too demanding.

    More involved web hosting companies will offer more involved services for their resellers. An example of this is white label support, a service where your hosting provider will provide support to your clients under your brand.

    1. Pick Your Prices
      ColonCrossings’ VPS reseller plans start at £7/mo, so it is fairly easy to make a profit when you are offered an affordable price by your host. ColonCrossing also offers flexible pricing, so you can add and remove RAM, CPU, storage and IP addresses as you need them and only pay for what you use.

    Look at what others in your niche are charging, and decide if you want to be on the affordable or premium end of the pricing spectrum.

    1. Set Up
      At this point you have purchased your plan and know what you want to charge: it’s time to go live with your business. General setup involves receiving an email from your host that welcomes you into the portal. Industry standard for VPS reseller hosting packages is downloading WHMCS which should be included in your purchase. ColonCrossing utilises Virtualizor (powerful, web-based VPS control panel) to support reseller and cloud accounts, it is extremely simple to use and the set up prompts are self-explanatory. Once you have installed your WHMCS module, you can begin to create your unique API key, create products, adjust the module settings, and begin filling out the custom fields.

    A complete set up depends on all of the features that you purchased. If you are new to this industry and are having trouble, reach out to customer support or your sales rep and ask for assistance. They should be happy to help you.

    1. Market Yourself
      Congratulations, you’re up and running! Now you just have to let people know that your new venture exists. If you already have a related business, such as web design, and are using web hosting as a complimentary service you can reach out to your existing customers. Send out an email campaign to your client base and let them know that you are now offering high-end hosting services. You can also update your business’ website and highlight your new service. Other ways to market your business include paid ads, search engine optimisation, implementing referral programs, participating in forums, and cross-promoting with partners related to your business.

    While reseller hosting requires minimal effort, you should still treat it like any other business. Follow up and ask for feedback from your customers to ensure that you are offering your clients the best, and always make sure that they are satisfied.

    Thanked by (3)COLBYLICIOUS ehab imxmm
  • @Rambo said:
    It's not about bankruptcy, nor it is about making money from it at this moment. I want to learn about it first before diving in.

    Customers will pay for your learning.
    Or Are You going to selling vps for free?

  • @arirang said: Customers will pay for your learning.

    Are you comfortable with English? I mentioned that I want to learn how to sell it first, and then I will start selling it. It's amazing how some people are so clueless these days.

    Success is not just a destination; it's a journey of growth, learning, and resilience. 🚀🌱

  • Easiest way would be to get a VPS reseller plan from some provider. You can use their panels, servers etc, add your markup and sell.

    Or you can get a dedi for cheap, use some tools like VF and Blesta to sell your VPS. Of course, this would require some technical learning/skills.

  • edited February 7

    @sh97 said: Or you can get a dedi for cheap, use some tools like VF and Blesta to sell your VPS. Of course, this would require some technical learning/skills.

    This is what I want to learn. Also, what does 'VF' mean? Could you please elaborate on the process a little bit?

    Also, please share some affordable VPS reseller plans..

    Success is not just a destination; it's a journey of growth, learning, and resilience. 🚀🌱

  • Thanked by (2)ehab yoursunny

    "He sounds like hearing him say to the liquor merchant: you who sell it what buys you better ?"
    F. De André --- Free NAT KVM

  • Fried chicken with BBQ sauce.

    Thanked by (1)host_c
  • It depends. What is your skillset at the moment? I think if we know what you currently know then we will be able to point you in the right direction.

    You are going to need to know Linux administration, using the command line, and your chosen virtualisation technology at the very least. You will be running a control panel which will primarily manage your host and virtual servers but there will be times you have an issue which you can't diagnose or fix using the panel then your Linux, CLI skills come into play.

  • "guys please answer my test paper for me. I am not going to pay and I expect a 90% score"

    Thanked by (2)AlwaysSkint cybertech

    The all seeing eye sees everything...

  • edited February 7

    IDK why the @admin hasn't banned these people who are trolling on a help post. Just grow up kids; it's not cool tho, you fools.

    Success is not just a destination; it's a journey of growth, learning, and resilience. 🚀🌱

  • edited February 7

    @SharedGrid said: It depends. What is your skillset at the moment? I think if we know what you currently know then we will be able to point you in the right direction.

    I am familiar with Linux and even use it as my daily driver. I am also comfortable with the CLI. However, I am only familiar with Debian commands. I know the basic fundamentals of virtualization, such as hypervisors, but I have never used any virtualization tools like SolusVM, Virtualizor, or Proxmox. do you have any suggestions for me?

    Success is not just a destination; it's a journey of growth, learning, and resilience. 🚀🌱

  • edited February 7

    @Rambo said:

    @SharedGrid said: It depends. What is your skillset at the moment? I think if we know what you currently know then we will be able to point you in the right direction.

    I am familiar with Linux and even use it as my daily driver. I am also comfortable with the CLI. However, I am only familiar with Debian commands. I know the basic fundamentals of virtualization, such as hypervisors, but I have never used any virtualization tools like SolusVM, Virtualizor, or Proxmox. do you have any suggestions for me?

    Yes, I suggest to stop at this point. It isn't worth the learning effort because the market won't need the basic things, there's already plenty available.
    If you want to learn marketing or sales, take one of the vps resellers and forget about the technical part. If you want to learn the technical part, first look for somebody who's going to sell your stuff. Doing both will end in both being just basic quality and there's no point for customers to pick your service and not somebody else's.
    Also, those question you just raised to us can be easily answered by doing a quick google search, that's nothing worth a discussion (what you typically do in a forum) imo.

  • @Rambo said:

    @SharedGrid said: It depends. What is your skillset at the moment? I think if we know what you currently know then we will be able to point you in the right direction.

    I am familiar with Linux and even use it as my daily driver. I am also comfortable with the CLI. However, I am only familiar with Debian commands. I know the basic fundamentals of virtualization, such as hypervisors, but I have never used any virtualization tools like SolusVM, Virtualizor, or Proxmox. do you have any suggestions for me?

    Personally, I would use a cloud server provider where you can pay per hour and install each control panel so you can properly test out their features. You'll be able to compare each one and decide what you want to go with. I think testing them would also help you formulate the type of service you would like to offer. Once done, you can tear down the servers and it's only cost you a few $.

    VirtFusion is also another VPS control panel you could take a look at - and after going through the same evaluation process recently, it's the one I would go for. It also seems to be the most popular amongst other VPS providers in the market. Second choice for me would probably be Proxmox, but if you want enterprise support then it does cost more.

    If you're only familiar when Debian, then that is absolutely fine as VirtFusion can run on both Debian and Red Hat based distros. Proxmox is Debian based too.

    Thanked by (1)Rambo
  • havochavoc OGContent Writer

    @Rambo said:
    IDK why the @admin hasn't banned these people who are trolling on a help post. Just grow up kids; it's not cool tho, you fools.

    Consider the possibility that some of the "don't do it" are actually serious.

    I for one decided against it given the lengthy list of negatives. Fraud, angry customers, stupid customers, expectations of support at unreasonable hours, lowballing by unethical competitors, saturated market, DCMA takedowns, maybe a bit of sprinkling of CP etc....all for razor thin margins. Just seeing some of the drama 2nd hand on here & LET made me conclude nah I'm good.

    Thanked by (3)skorous AlwaysSkint wankel
  • SolusVM/Virtualizor are the panels most hosts here use.

    Then you rent an 64GB E3 (you can set the CPU model that the VMs see to an EPYC, no worries), and cram 500x2GB VMs in there, basically. Offer it yearly for a few dollars and that's it.

    Thanked by (1)Rambo
  • bikegremlinbikegremlin ModeratorOGContent Writer

    @Rambo said:
    IDK why the @admin hasn't banned these people who are trolling on a help post. Just grow up kids; it's not cool tho, you fools.

    Ban?

    No.

    We publicly shoot the worst offender at the end of the month (so the jury is still out).

    ...the LES firing squad staying sharp:

    Thanked by (2)terrorgen ZuckZwing

    Relja of House Novović, the First of His Name, King of the Plains, the Breaker of Chains, WirMach Wolves pack member
    BikeGremlin's web-hosting reviews

  • edited February 8

    When you learn something and start a serious question, you should metion what you know and at least what you have googled at that time, and then ask what/how to do.

    Your question sounds to me "Hey tell me what to do from scratch for my learning and business"

    Thanked by (3)bikegremlin amj wankel
  • Why such users assume replies other than they want are trolls.

    Thanked by (1)carlin0
  • I though about selling VPS.
    But then you see people getting butchered on LET for 1$/y.

    Nah, but maybe its just the wrong clients or the wrong forum to sell or wrong target demographic.

    Thanked by (1)FrankZ
  • cybertechcybertech OGBenchmark King

    Success is not just a destination; it's a journey of growth, learning, and resilience. 🚀🌱

    I bench YABS 24/7/365 unless it's a leap year.

  • edited February 11

    I don't sell like that, but I've sold both Pterodactyl and Proxmox servers before.

    I started out offering to friends that I know host servers and in communities I was in, after maybe a month or two I was bringing in around €50 for €4 worth of server hardware every month. If I was you, I'd jump in learning how to setup one of these panels now.

    Setting up my own installation helped me understand a lot how they work and how hosting goes on and forward. I was renting a decent 75GB NVMe, 16GB GB RAM and 6 vCore (Xeon E5-2680v2) server for € 4 per month with 25TB of traffic, then I mounted dropbox as a FS and split it decently among the users, the hosting provider I had allowed overclocking so I'd just leave the speed at the default OC'd 3.4GHz and call it a day.

    If you need a good base point, I know a dude that hosts REALLY cheap VPSes on the annual basis, going as cheap as €3 per year. meegie.net.

    Edit: Corrections on both spelling and statements

    Thanked by (1)wankel
  • cserverscservers Hosting Provider

    At this point I'd personally think mere VPS reselling wouldn't do the trick, since everyone's price point is based at several subjective details. However, taking a dedicated server, having the knowledge to slice it and doing some VPSs with it... that could be something else.

  • @Rambo said: What's the most cost-effective way to begin selling or reselling VPS?

    Just answering your literal question: the most cost effective is a second hand, low-power, virtualization-capable box connected to your internet router.

    Let friends and family, trustworthy users, run their non-critical VPS's for free on your system.

    From there on, I can only repeat what's been said above.

    Good luck and have fun!

  • @bikegremlin said:

    @Rambo said:
    IDK why the @admin hasn't banned these people who are trolling on a help post. Just grow up kids; it's not cool tho, you fools.

    Ban?

    No.

    We publicly shoot the worst offender at the end of the month (so the jury is still out).

    ...the LES firing squad staying sharp:

    Hell yeah can I still get into contention for the crown?

    Thanked by (1)bikegremlin
  • I think it's very hard!

Sign In or Register to comment.